Mont Blanc Rollerball pen

Date Launched: 1924 – the first Meisterstücks were launched.

It was a Hamburg banker, Alfred Nehemias, and a Berlin engineer, August Eberstein, together recognised the signs of time and decided to produce pens, back in the 1906. A short while later Wilhelm Dziambor, Christian Lausen and Claus Johannes Voss took over the business and the foundations for the modern future of Mont Blanc was set.

Their first model, Rouge et Noir, was launched in 1909 and in 1910 the pen which was to give the company its new name, “Mont Blanc” was debuted. The Meisterstücks (or “masterpiece” in English) was first used in 1924 on Mont Blanc’s fountain pens.

Modern Meisterstücks include fountain pens, ballpoints, rollerballs, pencils, and even a highlighter pen. Unlike vintage Meisterstücks pens, modern variants are usually constructed from a composite resin as opposed to celluloid and bear most similarity to the Meisterstück designs of the 1950s. However, in keeping with the previous models using higher-end materials, such as precious metals, these are available under the sub-brand of “Solitaire”.

The company was acquired by Dunhill in 1977 and today forms part of the Rupert Family’s Richemont Group alongside Cartier, Van Cleef & Arpels and Baume et Mercier.

My Mont Blanc Rollerball pen: I love writing whether that is tapping out on a keyboard with a minimal number of fingers or long-hand in my scruffiest writing. My poor handwriting is made legible by me using my Mont Blanc Rollerball. I use the fine refills and something miraculous happens making my sort of Doctor scribble like fine calligraphy. I am lucky enough to have owned a fountain pen – the big fat one, several pencils and usual ball point pens in the Mont Blanc Meisterstuck range I even very happily received a leather sleeve – like a cigar tube a number of years ago that is branded with the Mont Blanc snow-flake and cries at least four pens.

Your Mont Blanc Rollerball pen:

Photo by Mont Blanc

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