Amazon Kindle Fire

Ok so I love books. I love small paperbacks, I love big coffee-table books – the ones with amazing pictures – and I love spending an hour in a bookshop looking at rows and rows of yes, you guessed it, books!

So the idea of e-books reducing several hundred amazing volumes onto a small tablet was for many years complete anathema. That is until I actually was give an Amazon Kindle Fire for Christmas a couple of years back – complete with a fabulously designed hard case that propped the Kindle up for you to read it. Well, the Kindle languished in its sturdy bright orange packaging until about May the following year when curiosity got the better of me and I decided to plug it in. Already being the owner of an Amazon account the password for which was prompted by the Kindle and a light then came on.

I am not the world’s fastest reader. In fact in my defence I enjoy luxuriating over the language and yes a novel that the average person can shoot through in a week-end may take me as much as a few months or more. The very idea of needing to take more than one book on a long plane ride or vacation seemed far fetched. To be told that my Amazon Kindle Fire could hold 6000 books was complete nonsense.

Since I first sparked the Amazon Kindle Fire into life I now have 39 books – and adding a new one every now and again.

The Amazon Kindle electronic book (e-book) reader was designed by Lab126/Amazon and launched in 2007. It was initiated by CEO Jeff Bezos in 2004 to build the world’s best e-reader. With a backlight screen the Kindle simulate reading on paper making it an easy to use alternative to a book.

In addition to downloading whole books the Kindle allows the user to browse – and obtain meaty samples of books – download for cost and for free e-books, newspapers and magazines via wireless networking to the Kindle Store at Amazon – which as July 2016 has more than 4.6m e-books available to the US market.

Kindle – meaning to light a fire – was the name devised by branding consultants Michael Cronan and Karin Hibma, being an apt metaphor for reading and intellectual excitement.

In addition to my Amazon Kindle Fire, Amazon has also introduced software to allow me to use the content of my Kindle on my iPhone and iPad via IOS technology. With a synch function that allows all devices to catch up to where I am in a book – which is very useful.

Since launch in 2007 to date there have been a huge number of editions – and international variations – and generations each improving on its predecessor – generally becoming more cost effective but with development such as the Kindle Paperwhite – released in most international markets in early 2013  updated in September of the year – forever changing the overall user experience.

A fine piece of modern design the Amazon Kindle Fire is defined to give the printed word a run for its money but curiously there seems to be some anecdotal evidence that the interest in books is currently experiencing a resurgence. 12 inch vinyl and bound books seeing a revival – surely great ideas!

Photo from Amazon

 

 

 

 

 

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