Alfa Romeo 1300 Duetto – For Sale

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Many of us will dream of owning a Sunday Car – a preferred classic car – that can be enjoyed in the right climate but for a limited amount of time. The aim is not to add materially to the mileage whilst ensuring that it works well when needed with  minimal trips to the mechanic. The dream is for you and your nearest to enjoy, pose a little, relax and breathe.

One of my clear favourites in this precise category is the Alfa Romeo 1300 convertible. I have celebrated this wonderful vehicle on several occasions in the columns of Aestheticons. Please click on the highlighted following links to read our previous posts – Alfa Romeo Spider and Alfa Romeo Giulietta Spider

The difficulty for many of our UK based readers is the availability of good stock of this beautiful car in Right Hand Drive. Well here’s a potential solution.

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The guys at the amazing Swiss-run curation site – in a nutshell comprising classic cars and associated lifestyle – Classic Driver –  Classic Driver – are busy celebrating their 20th anniversary with 20 Limited Edition Aston Martin DB11! Yes they launched in 1998 on the internet, geez I have shoes older –  Church’s Brogues . They are also currently running a campaign for an auction to take place on 7th July 2018 and by Historics at Brooklands. One particular vehicle to feature at this sale is a red – is there any other colour – 1970 Alfa Romeo 1300 – Alfa 1300 Convertible  – It carries a guide price/estimate of between £22,000 – £27,000. My feeling, whilst I am rubblish at valuations, is that looks like a particularly good sweet spot to kick off the innumerable pleasures of owning a classic car and enjoying classic motoring.

As many will know the Brooklands Museum is a venue particularly close to my heart – please see my previous post Mike Hawthorn – 1958 Formula One World Champion.

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This charming example of the Alfa Romeo Duetto is a right hand drive version and pre-dates the rather challenging era of added rubber bumpers that, in my view, detrimentally affected the aesthetics of this wonderful car in later models.

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STOPPRESS – Don’t know if you have yet had a chance to look at the listings for the Historics at Brooklands auction on 7th July 2018? A deeper study of what’s on offer has disclosed another classic Alfa Romeo – this time a left hooker – with an estimated value at between £50,000 to £60,000. A 1290cc 1957 Alfa Romeo Giulietta – simply one of the most stunning Alfas ever made.

 

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Image credits – with grateful thanks – Classic Driver and Historics at Brooklands https://www.historics.co.uk

 

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Clarks Desert Boots

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The Fast Show – a UK TV show from the mid-1990’s  – had a wealth of characters created by Charlie Higson and Paul Whitehouse – amongs others. One particular favourite was “Louis Balfour” – played by John Thomson – who was the oh so slightly pretentious presenter of “Jazz Club” with a catchphrase – when all else failed – of “Nice!”. You rarely got to see his feet but my bet is that he would’ve worn Clarks Desert Boots

See here a sample of Jazz Club The Best of Louis Balfour’s Jazz Club

Now you have to follow this, Louis was cut from a very similar cloth to a couple of Art Masters at my last school. They insisted on being called “Chris” and “Steve” as indeed I suspect they were their real names and as 6th Formers it seemed odd to continue with “Sir”. They wore corduroy jackets – in brown and country green – one with contrasting leather elbow patches – they had a penchant for practical Farah Hopsack trousers – don’t ask – and each had several pairs of iconic Clarks Desert Boots.

Quite what desert there were planning to cross in leafy Cheshire was uncertain but none the less these two were simply the coolest guys in the school.  “Steve” with his long hair even drove a late reg VW Beetle – click here to our previous post Volkswagen Beetle – an icon re-imagined – you can imagine he was already ice cool to me.

Assured not to be bitten by scorpions nor rattle snakes, Clarks Desert Boots to this day are an iconic and a highly flexible wardrobe essential that you can wear with jeans, moleskins or chinos and they will always look the part. Just avoid wearing in the rain – they are suede and, after all, are intended for deserts!

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C. & J. Clark International Ltd, (“Clarks”) was founded in 1825 by Quaker brothers Cyrus and James Clark in Street, (Somerset, England) where its HQ is still based – although manufacturing is now predominantly undertaken in Asia. Clark’s continues to be 84% family owned.

Since 1879 the Clark’s trade mark has been the distinctive Glastonbury Tor with the St Michael’s tower.

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The Desert Boot was launched in 1950 having been designed by the co-founders, James’, great-grandson, Nathan Clark, a serving British Army Officer based in Burma. It is said that the Desert Boot was based on the unlined boots made in the bazaar’s of Cairo for returning British Army Officers during the Second World War.

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Post War the Desert Boot saw adoption by the Mod Culture in UK, the Beatnik Culture in the US and were known to be a favourite of the Student anit-capitalist demonstrations in Paris in May 1968.

Why not be like Steve McQueen or Liam Gallagher and get a pair of Clarks original Desert Boots – please click the links below the images below to be directed to AMAZON – the two links show the full colour range available.

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Clarks Desert Boot, Men’s Derby, Braun (Cola Suede), 10 UK

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Clarks Originals Desert Boot, Men’s Derby Lace-Up, Brown (Brown Sde), 9 UK 43 EU)

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Images courtesy of C & J Clark International Limited

Ferrari Dino

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May be it’s the recent sad loss of the charmer Sir Roger Moore Volvo P1800– aka Lord Brett Sinclair in the early 1970’s caper ‘The Pursuaders!” with Tony Curtis – aka Bernard Schwartz/”Daniel” Danny Wilde as his gritty, wealthy, upstart crime co-fighter  – who drove one in the series – but I have recently been re-admiring the beguiling lines of the iconic Ferrari Dino.

The epic title sequence from “The Pursuaders!” – with an amazing John Barry soundtrack – can be seen here – enjoy! The Pursuaders! Titles

The Ferrari Dino was a brand of mid-engined, rear-drive sports cars produced by Ferrari from 1968 to 1976. It may be that the Dino first appeared during an era in my life typified by raging hormones but even forty years on I am humbled by the staggering beauty of this feat of Italian engineering.

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“Dino” – comes from founder, Enzo’s son and heir, “Alfredo” – nicknamed “Alfredino”- who, sadly, died in 1956 aged just twenty four suffering from Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

As used by Ferrari “Dino” was what they call in the fashion business a “diffusion line”, not the full-priced product but one basking in the shadow of the senior brand. During this era the Ferrari name was reserved for the 12 cylinder versions of the marque and “Dino” was used to support a range of more realistically priced versions of this classic sports car. Similarly to the use of the models “Boxster” and “Cayman” in the Porsche range today.

Enzo was initially doubtful about the safety of a mid-engined car but after some persuasion – get the connection….- he agree to allow Sergio Pininfarina to build a mid-engined concept car for the 1965 Paris Motor Show which carried only the “Dino” badge. By the 1966 Turin Show  a further prototype was shown and was very well received. Enzo was finally willing to green light production with the 206 GT. Only 152 Dino 206 GT were built.

The Dino range was described by three digits such as the 206 – being a 2 litre 6-cylinder (containing the signature V6 – designed by legendary Vittorio Jano – Alfredo actually had a hand in its design), 246 – being a 2.4-litre 6-cylinder and the 308 – being a 3.0-litre 8-cylinder.

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In 1969 the 206 GT was superseded by the more powerful steel bodied Dino 246 GT, initially only available as a fixed-top GT coupé,

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A targa topped GTS was launched in 1971 – our example shown has been Federalised for the US market by the addition of more bumpering and side indicators.

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The Dino 246 GT designed by Leonardo Fioravanti at Pininfarina was the first Ferrari to be produced in reasonably high numbers. Dino 246 production numbered 2,295 GTs and 1,274 GTSs, for a total production run of 3,569.

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Initially the Bertone designed 308 GT4 2+2, with its V8 engine was given a “Dino” badge between 1973 and 1976 when it was “upgraded” to a Ferrari. Not one of my favorite Ferraris but it did spawn a later model, the beautiful 308 GTB, the car that succeeded the Dino – and included the “Magnum PA” 308 GTS – but that’s another story!

Get you own die cast Dino by clicking the following AMAZON link Bburago Ferrari Dino 246 GTB 1:24

Get a Red Dino T shirt by clicking the following AMAZON link Ferrari 246 Dino legendary road icon mens T-Shirt (Large, Red)

Images courtesy of ITC Entertainment, Ferrari/Fiat and Bburago

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Lancia Fulvia Coupé

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There are several well known, even iconic brands, particularly in the automobile and fashion businesses, that having been subsumed into larger acquirers and, subsequently, shelved. A good example of this is Lancia, now part of the Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA Italy) conglomerate.

Their most recent car, the Lancia Ypsilon – based on the Fiat 500 platform – was re-branded in 2014 for the UK and Irish markets as a Chrysler. In 2017, it was announced that the Chrysler brand would no longer be used in the UK and Irish markets! It seems unlikely that the Lancia brand will be revived – which is a great tragedy.

I guess there’s a “dirt sticks” argument to the demise of Lancia for a UK audience. In the late 1980’s the Lancia Beta suffered greatly from sub-frame rust and corrosion issues so much so that they had to be repurchased by the company from disgruntled owners. Lancia withdrew from the right-hand drive market in 1994 selling their last model, the Lancia Delta, in 1995.

There have been some trophies among the mire, with a wealth of rally success but one particularly fine road going example is the iconic Lancia Fulvia Coupé.

Lancia & C. Fabbrica Automobili was founded in Turin in 1906 by former Fiat racing drivers, Vincenzo Lancia and Claudio Fogolin. The first Lancia was appropriately called “Alfa” and was produced between 1907 to 1908. Following Vincenzo’s death in 1937 his wife and son poached one of Alfa Romeo’s designers, Vittorio Jano, who oversaw a period of great innovation, including hydraulic dampers, five speed gearboxes, V4, V6 and V8 engines. Early vehicles were virtually handmade.

The business was sold to Fiat in October 1969 and there followed an era when Lancia’s claim to fame was in World Rallying.

The Lancia Fulvia was produced between 1963 and 1976 following its launch to great applause at the 1963 Geneva Motor Show.

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Like its predecessor the Aurelia, it took its name from a Roman Road; the via Fulvia being that stretch that ran between Tortona to Turin.

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The Fulvia was available as a Berlina (saloon) 4-door saloon – as above – (in 1972 as a V4 version), a 2-door Coupé, and Sport. Ugo Zogato’s team also designed and built a fastback coupé – based on the Coupé’s floorpan – and, in 1968, a prototype Zagato Sport Spider that debuted at the 1968 Turin Motor Show.

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The Fulvia Coupé was a compact two-seater coupé was initially equipped with a 1216 cc engine, delivering 80 bhp at 6000 rpm, this was gradually enlarged to a 1534 cc engine delivering 132 bhp. Designed by Lancia’s in-house designer, Piero Castagnero, the Fulvia had a shorter wheelbase than the Berlina and it was the last Fulvia model to be discontinued. It was replaced by the ill-fated Lancia Beta Coupé in 1977.

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In 1971 the Lancia Fulvia Coupé Series II Coupé had a 1298 cc engine producing 90 hp (67 kW) at 6000 rpm. A special celebratory model was released in 1972 to celebrate Lancia’s Montecarlo Rally victory that year. An update Series 2 Coupe – becoming the Coupé 3 – was introduced in 1974 .

In 2003 at the Frankfurt Motor Show, the Fulvia name was re-imagined in a concept from the Centro Stile Lancia headed by Flavio Manzoni. Sadly, the new Fulvia Coupé, with its distinctive brown leather interior, didn’t progress past prototype.

Lancia Fulvia 2003 Concept

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As Lancia Fulvia Coupe’s are increasing in value – may be you’d be happy to settle of a desk top but loyal die-cast model? Please click the Amazon link after the image.

There’s a choice – a red Lancia Fulvia Coupe in rally livery – please click the Amazon link below the image

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Lancia Fulvia Coupe Hf Rally Car Lampinen Andreasson 1/43Rd No1 Type Y0675J

Or in a beautiful dark blue – please click the Amazon link below the image

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BEST MODEL BT9645 LANCIA FULVIA COUPE’ 1300S 1967 DARK BLUE 1:43 DIE CAST MODEL

Do you have any Old Italian Legends in your life? If so this is the perfect long sleeved T shirt for them! Click the Amazon link below the image 

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 Teesandengines Men’s LANCIA FULVIA COUPE Grey Long Sleeved T-shirt Size Medium

Or the short sleeved version – for the Spring and Summer! Please click on the Amazon link below the image.

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TEESANDENGINES Men’s Lancia FULVIA Coupe 1972 Italian Grey T-Shirt Size XXXXLarge

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Images courtesy of Lancia

VéloSolex moped

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Increasingly dependent on getting from A to B as quickly as possible I have noticed a rise in commuters using electrically operated bicycles and small motorized scooters. They seem to offer limited comfort and even less protection for the rider who, for an inexplicable reason, think they have the power of a large Harley, BMW or Honda at their fingertips and get themselves into precarious positions on the road causing much frustration to others.

In a far gentler era the predecessor of these street demons was VéloSoleX or more frequently referred to as a Solex which was moped – or motorised bicycle – originally produced by Solex who were based in Paris (France) and founded by engineering friends, Maurice Goudard and Marcel Mennesson.

Designed by Mennesson during World War II, the Solex was produced between 1946 and 1988 in a variety of versions largely utilising the same technology of a motor with roller resting on and driving the front wheel of the bicycle.

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Being very competitively priced and hugely economical to run, the Soles was a massive success. In total it sold in excess of 7m units. In 1947 even BP created “Solexine”, a pre-mixed  oil and petrol mix for the Solex’s two stroke engine and sold in a 2L can. By the late 1940’s Solex was selling 100 units a day rising to 1500 a day by the mid-1960’s – when it was blessed with a new maximum – though limited – speed of 30 km.

The company now makes a range of electrically powered bicycles. An early version, designed by Pininfarina, was launched in 2005 as the E-Solex.

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By 2014 the Solexity Infinity was launched, again from the pen of Pininfarina – with capacity to travel up to 80 km on one charge – at the costs of around €2,000 – keeping the brand alive!

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As French as the Beret, Brie and Baguette, the Solex, a classic French icon of the mid-20th century, has a very special place in my psyche as I explored the opportunity in the 1980’s of importing them into the UK. It was perhaps my first brush with the ever increasing dominance of the words “Health & Safety” in our national idiom.

I was required to deliver details to the Ministry of Transport who after some consideration and lots of teeth sucking, decided that the fuel tank, which was then made of a reasonable durable plastic was too feeble to withstand any front-end impact and the risks of fire were too great.

Solex also commissioned various evocative advertising posters, which in their own right are increasingly collectable.

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For our French speaking friend’s – we know who you are – the equivalent of a an Owner’s Manual for a Vélosolex is a must – Le Guide du Vélosolex click the Amazon link below the image to get yours!

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Le guide du Vélosolex

Why not pick up a classic French VeloSolex enamel sign that will look at home in your Gite in La Gironde, on the wall of your Flat in Fulham or your Man-cave in Manchester! Click the AMAZON link below the image

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FRENCH VINTAGE METAL SIGN 40x30cm RETRO AD VELOSOLEX LE VRAI BICYCLESD2C56E9B-03F2-4C9E-AF3A-13C55668EEA2

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FRENCH VINTAGE METAL SIGN 40x30cm RETRO AD VELOSOLEX REFERENDUM 2

I love VeloSolex – and all this little motor cycle represents – you can too with this iconic T Shirt! Please click the Amazon link below the image 

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Velosolex Moped T-Shirt. Gents Ladies Kids Sizes. Bike Cycling France Motorcycle:X Large – 48″

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Photo Credits – with grateful thanks – Solex SA

Piaggio Vespa ET2 Scooter

With a history dating back to 1882, Enrico and, his father, Rinaldo Piaggio were initially involved in the naval, railway and aeronautical worlds. Post War Italy saw the family seeking alternative products and the Vespa can trace its original to a single model scooter manufactured in 1946 by Piaggio & Co. S.p.A. in Pontedera (Italy).

With the eye of designer Corrodino D’Ascanio and the engineering know-how of Piaggio’s team of Renzo Spolti and Vittorio Casini they took the unsatisfactory earlier prototype MP5 – “duckling” – and transformed it into the MP6 with a rear mounted engine (originally a 98 cc air-cooled two stroke) giving direct drive to the rear wheel and step-through design. On seeing this masterpiece Enrico Piaggio is said to have cried – “Sembra una vespa!” (“It resembles a wasp!”) thus naming his new scooter.

The patent for the Vespa was applied for in April 1946 and a granted in December and the Vespa was publicly debuted at the 1946 Milan Fair – with sales stimulated by an instalment payment arrangement.

The iconic nature of the Vespa was assured by its design and technology but its promotion was greatly assisted by its appearance in films such as “Roman Holiday”

By 1960 two million Vespas had been sold and by the late 1980’s this figure has risen to over ten million. Variations including the 125 cc and 200 cc PX and the ET series further developed the brand.

Since 1959 Piaggio been in the control of the Agnelli family, with Giovanni Agnelli’s death in 1997, this important influence was lost. In 1999 the business was acquired by Morgan Grenfell Private Equity. By 2003, the company was perilously close to bankruptcy with unserviceable levels of debt. Roberto Colaninno made an initial investment of €100m in exchange for just under a third of Piaggio in October 2003 and his appointee Rocco Gabelli rationalised the business and redesigned the factory to become an assembly line.

The ET model, my particular favourite, was true to the original design of the MP5. It had an automatic gearbox – essential for a scooter novices like me and a choice of engines – a 50 cc two or four stroke or a 150 cc four stroke.

The vast expense of parking in Central London combined with a move deeper into SW London – and the resultant longer and more uncomfortable train/tube/bus commute – prompted me to buy my ET2 in 1998. It was an excellent decision. Overnight, I saved time and money – above all I truly liberated myself from the grind of commuter travelling.

As I drove my Vespa ET2 – shown in our featured photo – on a car driver’s licence I was able to drive it with a passenger. A full CBT bike test was required for the bigger engine ET4 which I didn’t have any real desire to take. My wife was a willing pillion but she is half my size. Our combined commute to the West End was really very enjoyable – on dry days. We had matching Driza-Bone stockman coats for wet days and the site of us return home one evening prompted a neighbour to ask a couple of days later whether I though it safe taking the children on the scooter with me!

Photo from Piaggio